Entanglement

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Entanglement refers to a phenomenon where two or more particles become intrinsically correlated, or entangled, in such a way that their states become interdependent


Entanglement

In the context of quantum computing, entanglement refers to a fundamental phenomenon where two or more particles become intrinsically correlated, or entangled, in such a way that their states become interdependent.

This means that the properties of one particle, such as its position, momentum, or spin, cannot be described independently of the other entangled particles. Instead, the particles exist in a shared state, and any changes to one particles state will instantaneously affect the state of the other particles, regardless of their distance from each other. This instantaneous correlation, which Einstein famously referred to as spooky action at a distance, is a key aspect of entanglement.

Entanglement is a powerful resource in quantum computing since it allows for the creation of quantum states that are not possible using classical systems. By harnessing entanglement, quantum computers can perform certain calculations much more efficiently than classical computers.

One of the key applications of entanglement is in quantum teleportation, where the state of a particle can be transferred from one location to another by entangling it with another particle and then teleporting its state to the distant location using measurements on the entangled particles.

Entanglement is also a crucial concept in quantum cryptography, as it enables the secure transmission of information. Any attempt to intercept or measure an entangled particle would disturb its state, alerting the communicating parties to potential eavesdropping.

Overall, entanglement is a fascinating and essential phenomenon in quantum computing, bringing about new possibilities for computation, communication, and encryption.